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Summary: An Introduction to the Christmas Season. Sometimes we get our priorities a little mixed up during Christmas. This short skit features a father and his teenage son where the father learns a lesson about the giving of time to others instead of himself. Style: Light-hearted.   Duration: 4min.
Actors: 1M, 1 teenage M

Script

(Father enters stage carrying a large box marked “X-mass lights”. Teenage son enters from same side of stage carrying four boxes of the same stacked so high that he can’t see where he is going.)

Father: (Looks up at the outside of his house.) I’ve got it all figured out! Come on son, hurry up!

Son: I can’t see, dad. Where are you?

Father: Over here. Just follow my voice.

Son: Where do you want these? They’re heavy.

Father: (Getting out pack of papers.) Oh, just set them down.

Son: OK. (He drops the boxes with a crash.)

Father: This year is going to be the year! I know it. I can feel it.

Son: The only thing I can feel is the numbness in my arms. Why are we doing this again?

Father: (Hands him a flyer.) This is why, my son.

Son: (Reading.) Cityville annual Holiday Lighting Contest. First prize: $500 cash.

Father: Yep, I can taste that prize money already.

Son: But dad, we just spent over $500 for the new lighting control system. If you needed the money, you could just not put up the lights in the first place.

Father: Yes, well, never mind that. Do you think we picked up enough extension cords?

Son: (Sarcastically) I’m not sure. I think we picked up about 10,000 feet.

Father: (Pause) Maybe one more trip to the hardware store.

Son: You’re scaring me, dad. You have that look in your eye again.

Father: What look?

Son: That look you get every year. It’s this contest. It makes you a little crazy.

Father: I am not crazy. Driven, maybe, but not crazy. You know, son, I’ve been trying to win this contest for the past 6 years in a row and it never fails. I always come in 2nd place. No matter what I do, Jack Landry at 116 Maple always comes in 1st place. He always edges me out. But not this year. This year I’ve doubled my number of lights, had my electrical service upgraded, installed 25 snow machines, constructed an entire Santa’s workshop, and, one week before Christmas, I’m having real-live reindeer brought in to complete the scene. I can’t lose! (Maniacal laughing.)

Son: Wow. You’re more than a little crazy, you’ve totally lost it.

Father: You want to know the best part? I drove by old Jack’s house yesterday and you know what? He hasn’t even started putting up his lights yet. Usually he’s got at least 20,000 lights up by now but there isn’t a single extension cord out yet. Victory will be mine!!!

Son: Well, I’m not surprised he hasn’t started yet.

Father: What, you know something? You have intelligence on my enemy? Quick, tell me what you know!

Son: I heard at church that Mr. Landry lost his job last month and now he’s really sick. His family is really worried about him.

Father: Ha ha! (Starts dancing around and singing.) I’m gonna win! I’m gonna win!

Son: (Shocked.) Dad! Father: (Stops dancing.) What? Oh, yeah. (Forced sympathy) Poor, Mr. Landry. Real shame. (Back to business) Oh, well. Come on and help me get this star of Bethlehem on the roof. We’re running out of daylight.

Son: Actually, Dad, I’m meeting up with a bunch of people from youth group this afternoon for a service project.

Father: Today? But, Son, this is my year! I can’t do this by myself. We’re a team, remember? I’ve taught you everything I know about exterior electrical effects and pyrotechnics. You can’t let me down now.

Son: Dad, aren’t you are always telling me to use my talents for ministry?

Father: (Grudgingly.) Yes.

Son: And Christmas especially is a time for giving, right?

Father: Theoretically, I suppose.

Son: And the youth leader specifically asked me for my help today. They are really counting on me.

Father: Oh, alright. I guess I can handle most of this on my own. I’m still going to need help with some of the larger items when you get back, okay?

Son: Okay. Thanks, Dad.

Father: What are you kids up to today?

Son: Oh, nothing big. Not a big deal.

Father: Well, what is it?

Son: We’re doing some decorating. You know, for Christmas and stuff.

Father: Where? At the church?

Son: No.

Father: At the pastor’s house?

Son: (Reluctantly) Not the pastor’s house.

Father: Then, whose house?

Son: (reluctantly) Mr. Landry’s. (Father is just standing staring out at the audience speechless.) Dad, are you okay?

Father: I, ah, um.... I’m not... um... But, my year... I’m sorry, Son. Just give me a second.

Son: It was our youth leader’s idea. I don’t have to go if you don’t want me to.

Father: You say Jack is really sick?

Son: Yah. Father: How sick?

Son: The doctors say he had a heart attack and was told not to leave the house for a while.

Father: (Change of heart) Wow.

Son: So, do you want me to stay here and help you instead of going?

Father: No. No. I’m sorry, son. You’re right. You should go. They need you.

Son: Are you sure?

Father: Yeah. As a matter of fact, I have an idea. Grab those boxes and get them in the back of the pick-up truck. I’m coming with you.

Son: Really?

Father: Yes, yes. It wouldn’t be right for me to beat Jack this way. We are going to make sure that Mr. Landry’s winning streak doesn’t end this year. Come on! (They pick up the boxes and exit the stage.)

Son: Right behind you, Dad! ……………………………….

© Copyright Adam Gee, all rights reserved. The script may not be reproduced, translated or copied in any medium, including books, CDs and on the Internet, without written permission of the authors. This play may be performed free of charge, on the condition that copies are not sold for profit in any medium, nor any entrance fee charged. In exchange for free performance, the author would appreciate being notified of when and for what purpose the play is performed. He may be contacted at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.